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What caught my attention for weeks 49 and 50.

“The goal of foresight isn’t to know what will happen, but rather to create opportunities, as an individual or organization, to grow your resilience and adaptability to change, and be not only more prepared, but also uncover valuable self-knowledge in the process.” — Toshi Anders Hoo

 

“Change is what we make it. It can be scary or embraced. Change evolves and is circular. A beginning means there is an ending. An ending means there is a beginning. Honor the emotions, don’t get bogged down in the “what ifs.” — Judy Micale

 

“Creative work is anything that requires us to create something new. It can be written, physical, or a new way of doing things.

(…) So not only does the creative knowledge worker have to metaphorically dance between work teams, communities of practice, and professional communities, but also between the ordered domain and the complex domain. Ladies and gentlemen, please put on your dance shoes. The 21st century has arrived!” — @hjarche

 

“We listened and were listened to. We felt seen and heard, and this sense of connection felt incredibly therapeutic. Being granted permission to verbalise our version of events as they unfolded enabled us to sense-make and feel slightly better about the world. Our relationships strengthened as we shared a common experience, and our resilience grew as a result.

(…) Aside from the restorative nature of human connection at a personal level, relationship and community are undisputed linchpins for business in the future of work. They’re superpowers no algorithm can replace.” — @cat_pearce71

 

“A community is like a ship; everyone ought to be prepared to take the helm.” — Henrik Ibsen HT @JosieJosieg

 

“Asynchronous communication is all about sharing reflections. The word “reflection” could put one off; it sounds somewhat abstract. That’s why I give participants a limited set of questions they need to answer at regular intervals. Take these examples: “What have you learned today?” or “What went really well this week?” or even “Have you got an idea brewing within you to help improve processes?” — Isabel De Clercq

 

“Knowledge can’t be forced out of people by a process or a technology. People share knowledge for a range of motivations in my view. It may surprise some people that often its a desire to share knowledge through a sense of altruism and compassion for a colleague.

Ask yourself – would you let a colleague make a blunder or undertake a longer piece of work than was necessary if you had the key to help them?

People also share knowledge, because we all like to share our good work, look the expert and expand our network of influence within the organisation.

One of the positive sides of the pandemic I’ve seen is an increased desire to help colleagues out by sharing knowledge, in recognition that we are all going through difficult times and we aren’t in the office. Looking forward we need to make sure that this continues.

People within an organisation want to share knowledge, though I’ve found that organisations often find intriguing ways to constrict that flow either through their behaviours or processes.” — Andrew Trickett

Time to be slow, John O’Donohue ‘This is the time to be slow, Lie low to the wall Until the bitter weather passes’

HT @relume1

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